Article complet: EMI et Apple font dans le sans DRM

02.04.07

Permalien 22:32:37 Catégories: News, Multimédia   French (FR)

EMI et Apple font dans le sans DRM

itunes

Emi a envoyé un communiqué qui réponds à la keynote0 faussement incendiaire de Steve "get a" Jobs et annonce qu'elle mets à disposition des internautes, par Itunes, la totalité de son répertoire SANS DRM.
Cerise sur le gâteau, les musiques encodées en AAC seraient de meilleure qualité (256 kbps) que le catalogue "traditionnel" d'Itunes (128 kbps).
Apple a confirmé la news ;)

En revanche, les pistes ne sont pas au même prix, le client devra payer 0.30 € de plus (1.29€ au lieu de 0.99€).
Si vous avez déjà acheté une piste protégée, il vous en coûtera 0.30€ pour avoir la version non protégée.

Alors si c'est une bonne idée, car comme je le disais, je pense ne pas être le seul à vouloir payer plus, mais sans DRM, on pourrait être tenté de dire "pourquoi payer plus, alors qu'on peut péter la protection d'Itunes" avec QTFairUse 6.

En tous, c'est un départ ;)

On en parle sur le forum, merci à Eftwyrd pour l'info ;)


-----------------------------------

 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Voici le texte intégrale d'illuminé en allu brossé:
SteveJobs, Thoughts on Music :
Steve Jobs
February 6, 2007

With the stunning global success of Apple’s iPod music player and iTunes online music store, some have called for Apple to “open” the digital rights management (DRM) system that Apple uses to protect its music against theft, so that music purchased from iTunes can be played on digital devices purchased from other companies, and protected music purchased from other online music stores can play on iPods. Let’s examine the current situation and how we got here, then look at three possible alternatives for the future.

To begin, it is useful to remember that all iPods play music that is free of any DRM and encoded in “open” licensable formats such as MP3 and AAC. iPod users can and do acquire their music from many sources, including CDs they own. Music on CDs can be easily imported into the freely-downloadable iTunes jukebox software which runs on both Macs and Windows PCs, and is automatically encoded into the open AAC or MP3 formats without any DRM. This music can be played on iPods or any other music players that play these open formats.

The rub comes from the music Apple sells on its online iTunes Store. Since Apple does not own or control any music itself, it must license the rights to distribute music from others, primarily the “big four” music companies: Universal, Sony BMG, Warner and EMI. These four companies control the distribution of over 70% of the world’s music. When Apple approached these companies to license their music to distribute legally over the Internet, they were extremely cautious and required Apple to protect their music from being illegally copied. The solution was to create a DRM system, which envelopes each song purchased from the iTunes store in special and secret software so that it cannot be played on unauthorized devices.

Apple was able to negotiate landmark usage rights at the time, which include allowing users to play their DRM protected music on up to 5 computers and on an unlimited number of iPods. Obtaining such rights from the music companies was unprecedented at the time, and even today is unmatched by most other digital music services. However, a key provision of our agreements with the music companies is that if our DRM system is compromised and their music becomes playable on unauthorized devices, we have only a small number of weeks to fix the problem or they can withdraw their entire music catalog from our iTunes store.

To prevent illegal copies, DRM systems must allow only authorized devices to play the protected music. If a copy of a DRM protected song is posted on the Internet, it should not be able to play on a downloader’s computer or portable music device. To achieve this, a DRM system employs secrets. There is no theory of protecting content other than keeping secrets. In other words, even if one uses the most sophisticated cryptographic locks to protect the actual music, one must still “hide” the keys which unlock the music on the user’s computer or portable music player. No one has ever implemented a DRM system that does not depend on such secrets for its operation.

The problem, of course, is that there are many smart people in the world, some with a lot of time on their hands, who love to discover such secrets and publish a way for everyone to get free (and stolen) music. They are often successful in doing just that, so any company trying to protect content using a DRM must frequently update it with new and harder to discover secrets. It is a cat-and-mouse game. Apple’s DRM system is called FairPlay. While we have had a few breaches in FairPlay, we have been able to successfully repair them through updating the iTunes store software, the iTunes jukebox software and software in the iPods themselves. So far we have met our commitments to the music companies to protect their music, and we have given users the most liberal usage rights available in the industry for legally downloaded music.

With this background, let’s now explore three different alternatives for the future.

The first alternative is to continue on the current course, with each manufacturer competing freely with their own “top to bottom” proprietary systems for selling, playing and protecting music. It is a very competitive market, with major global companies making large investments to develop new music players and online music stores. Apple, Microsoft and Sony all compete with proprietary systems. Music purchased from Microsoft’s Zune store will only play on Zune players; music purchased from Sony’s Connect store will only play on Sony’s players; and music purchased from Apple’s iTunes store will only play on iPods. This is the current state of affairs in the industry, and customers are being well served with a continuing stream of innovative products and a wide variety of choices.

Some have argued that once a consumer purchases a body of music from one of the proprietary music stores, they are forever locked into only using music players from that one company. Or, if they buy a specific player, they are locked into buying music only from that company’s music store. Is this true? Let’s look at the data for iPods and the iTunes store – they are the industry’s most popular products and we have accurate data for them. Through the end of 2006, customers purchased a total of 90 million iPods and 2 billion songs from the iTunes store. On average, that’s 22 songs purchased from the iTunes store for each iPod ever sold.

Today’s most popular iPod holds 1000 songs, and research tells us that the average iPod is nearly full. This means that only 22 out of 1000 songs, or under 3% of the music on the average iPod, is purchased from the iTunes store and protected with a DRM. The remaining 97% of the music is unprotected and playable on any player that can play the open formats. Its hard to believe that just 3% of the music on the average iPod is enough to lock users into buying only iPods in the future. And since 97% of the music on the average iPod was not purchased from the iTunes store, iPod users are clearly not locked into the iTunes store to acquire their music.

The second alternative is for Apple to license its FairPlay DRM technology to current and future competitors with the goal of achieving interoperability between different company’s players and music stores. On the surface, this seems like a good idea since it might offer customers increased choice now and in the future. And Apple might benefit by charging a small licensing fee for its FairPlay DRM. However, when we look a bit deeper, problems begin to emerge. The most serious problem is that licensing a DRM involves disclosing some of its secrets to many people in many companies, and history tells us that inevitably these secrets will leak. The Internet has made such leaks far more damaging, since a single leak can be spread worldwide in less than a minute. Such leaks can rapidly result in software programs available as free downloads on the Internet which will disable the DRM protection so that formerly protected songs can be played on unauthorized players.

An equally serious problem is how to quickly repair the damage caused by such a leak. A successful repair will likely involve enhancing the music store software, the music jukebox software, and the software in the players with new secrets, then transferring this updated software into the tens (or hundreds) of millions of Macs, Windows PCs and players already in use. This must all be done quickly and in a very coordinated way. Such an undertaking is very difficult when just one company controls all of the pieces. It is near impossible if multiple companies control separate pieces of the puzzle, and all of them must quickly act in concert to repair the damage from a leak.

Apple has concluded that if it licenses FairPlay to others, it can no longer guarantee to protect the music it licenses from the big four music companies. Perhaps this same conclusion contributed to Microsoft’s recent decision to switch their emphasis from an “open” model of licensing their DRM to others to a “closed” model of offering a proprietary music store, proprietary jukebox software and proprietary players.

The third alternative is to abolish DRMs entirely. Imagine a world where every online store sells DRM-free music encoded in open licensable formats. In such a world, any player can play music purchased from any store, and any store can sell music which is playable on all players. This is clearly the best alternative for consumers, and Apple would embrace it in a heartbeat. If the big four music companies would license Apple their music without the requirement that it be protected with a DRM, we would switch to selling only DRM-free music on our iTunes store. Every iPod ever made will play this DRM-free music.

Why would the big four music companies agree to let Apple and others distribute their music without using DRM systems to protect it? The simplest answer is because DRMs haven’t worked, and may never work, to halt music piracy. Though the big four music companies require that all their music sold online be protected with DRMs, these same music companies continue to sell billions of CDs a year which contain completely unprotected music. That’s right! No DRM system was ever developed for the CD, so all the music distributed on CDs can be easily uploaded to the Internet, then (illegally) downloaded and played on any computer or player.

In 2006, under 2 billion DRM-protected songs were sold worldwide by online stores, while over 20 billion songs were sold completely DRM-free and unprotected on CDs by the music companies themselves. The music companies sell the vast majority of their music DRM-free, and show no signs of changing this behavior, since the overwhelming majority of their revenues depend on selling CDs which must play in CD players that support no DRM system.

So if the music companies are selling over 90 percent of their music DRM-free, what benefits do they get from selling the remaining small percentage of their music encumbered with a DRM system? There appear to be none. If anything, the technical expertise and overhead required to create, operate and update a DRM system has limited the number of participants selling DRM protected music. If such requirements were removed, the music industry might experience an influx of new companies willing to invest in innovative new stores and players. This can only be seen as a positive by the music companies.

Much of the concern over DRM systems has arisen in European countries. Perhaps those unhappy with the current situation should redirect their energies towards persuading the music companies to sell their music DRM-free. For Europeans, two and a half of the big four music companies are located right in their backyard. The largest, Universal, is 100% owned by Vivendi, a French company. EMI is a British company, and Sony BMG is 50% owned by Bertelsmann, a German company. Convincing them to license their music to Apple and others DRM-free will create a truly interoperable music marketplace. Apple will embrace this wholeheartedly.



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Je viens de lire le thread sur le site macbidouille, ça faisait longtemps que je n'avais pas autant ri Laughing
http://forum.macbidouille.com/index.php?showtopic=208084



 hogs sur le forum a écrit:
superbe lecture !!

Merci lmame Wink



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Salut Hogs Smile Ca va?
Quelques éléments sont pris du site "so sue me" au fait Smile j'étais tellement énervé que j'ai oublié de mettre les sources Arf



 hogs sur le forum a écrit:
Yep ça va,

Ces temps ci je passe plus de temps à hanter des donjons virtuels à la recherches de princesses à sauver qu'à traîner sur la toile.
Mais il est vrai que le culte dont est l'objet sa Seigneurie m'énerve au plus haut point. A croire que le bon sens n'a plus sa place lorsque on parle d'Apple.
Il y a qu'à lire les descente en flammes lorsque tu as le malheur de critiquer "dieu" et ses "miracles" ... c'est un blasphème !

Si l'esprit critique est toujours de ce monde, il n'est pas bien représenté dans la secte des pommiers, du moins sa composante s'exprimant sur le web



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Oui c'est un peu ça qui me chagrine quand même de temps en temps c'est de l'amour un peu "trop" aveugle Smile
Mais il y a des fanatiques un peu dans tous les "clans", chez Sony, chez Nintendo, chez Apple, chez M$ et c'est un peu dommage car il y a des choses bien chez un peu partout, et de belles bouses / contradictions aussi Laughing

Pour revenir à Steve, s'il avait vraiment voulu faire évoluer les choses, en tant que fabricant d'Ipod et grande plate forme de vente de musique en ligne, il aurait un peu forcé la main des majors en fournissant du MP3 ou du Ogg, au moins pour une partie du catalogue. Je ne sais pas vraiment si les "majors" pourraient se passer réellement d'une telle passerelle il resterait certes (pour la France) la FNAC, Virgin, Connect (ah ah ah ah Connect Laughing pardon c'est nerveux) mais ce n'est pas aussi connu que le site d'Apple.

Ceci dit, je ne serai pas hostile à une option supplémentaire dans Itunes, par exemple un abonnement mensuel (ou autre chose?) qui permette l'export en MP3 ou Ogg des morceaux. Ca fait une surtaxe quelque part mais ça dédouanerait Steve.

Ceci dit, je suis le premier à dire que dans le cas où les morceaux Itunes perdraient leur DRM je les mettrai aussitôt dans mon GSM ou mon lecteur MP3.

Ceci dit, les Ipod constituent maintenant un "bel" objet de mode et comme ils sont déclinés dans toutes les formes, variations, tailles, capacités je pense très honnêtement que le passage en non DRM n'impacterait que peu la vente d'Ipod au niveau mondial surtout qu'il s'agit de la seule marque "stable". Il n'y a pas d'équivalent chez Sony ou M$ par exemple, on dit qu'on va prendre un Ipod, qu'importe qu'il soit de 1G, 2G, nano etc... Ca reste un Ipod Smile

Le hic c'est qu'alors les majors risquent de saisir la balle au bond et d'attaquer le maillon le plus faible de la chaîne, à savoir le ministre des coupettes de champagne au courage de pacotille histoire de passer un décrêt qui interdise la vente de morceaux non protégés. Rolling Eyes

Bref avec son petit laïus Steve ne prends pas vraiment de risque, la preuve c'est que ces derniers jours personne n'a moufté, ni du côté du ministère (normal, il ne réponds que quand on le siffle celui là) ni du côté des majors Smile
Les seuls à réagir (en France) sont les associations de consommateurs qui, même si elles n'y croient pas des masses, utilisent ça pour faire un appel du pieds, les internautes et les midinettes.
Reste le cas VirginMega qui propose déjà une partie en MP3 qui pousse au crime Smile



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Pour les jeux en ligne je te comprends Laughing c'était RoseNA, mais comme Noos débloque un peu en ce moment, petite pause Very Happy

Tu as vu pour LOTR Online?



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Et voici la réponse de Macrovision Very Happy
http://macrovision.com/company/news/drm/response_letter.shtml



 Eftwyrd sur le forum a écrit:
Et voici la réponse d'EMI Very Happy
http://www.emigroup.com/Press/2007/press18.htm



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Ahhh enfin des gens intelligents Smile A mon avis des gens sont prêts à payer plus chers s'il n'y a pas de DRM Very Happy

Mais bon, on passe quand même de 0.99 € à 1.29 € Smile

Ceci dit, ils disent que les pistes seront plus chères car sans DRM et près de la qualité CD comparée à la qualité des "anciennes" pistes DRM d'Itunes.
Perso je trouve ça ridicule car un MP3 à 128 kbps arrive déjà à la qualité CD, mais pas mal de gens s'inventent une oreille musicale pour pinailler et faire croire qu'ils écoutent des trucs encodés à 320 kbps sur leur Ipod avec des écouteurs à 300 €...



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Les fichiers seraient encodés en 256 kbps Smile
J'ai fait une news sur le blog Wink



 Eftwyrd sur le forum a écrit:
Moi je fais largement la différence entre un CD et un mp3 à 128kbits/s. Pourtant je n'ai pas l'oreille musicale, mais certains sons sont quand même beaucoup plus métalliques.
Après entre un AAC 128 et un 256, la différence est sûrement beaucoup moins flagrante, sûrement indécelable avec ma pauvre oreille.

Pour le prix : les singles augmentent, pas si on achète l'albim complet (ils restent à 9€99), c'est déjà ça. De toute façon les anti-DRM risquent de continuer à râler parce que c'est trop cher sans.



 comte Zero sur le forum a écrit:
lmame :
... mais pas mal de gens s'inventent une oreille musicale pour pinailler et faire croire qu'ils écoutent des trucs encodés à 320 kbps sur leur Ipod avec des écouteurs à 300 €...


Justement, je suis sur un coup pour des Shure E3C a pas trop chère (enfin comparé au prix standard français Embarassed )...
Si ça marche, je pourrais essayer de faire un comparo de bitrate avec ces écouteurs...



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Oui c'est là que je parle de différence, quand on écoute sur un GSM ou un lecteur MP3 Smile quand on est dans le métro ou dans le train, ça m'étonnerait que la différence se voit énormément Very Happy
Mais c'est sûr que si la qualité est meilleure au départ, on peut refaire un coup de compression pour le mettre sur le GSM et gagner de la place.
En revanche reste à voir quand ils feront l'annonce pour la France et quand ils le mettront en place Wink

Bonne nouvelle en revanche pour le prix de l'album Wink



 S@turnin sur le forum a écrit:
Et la réponse du S@t :
Y s'en fout car son ipod est encore dans les méandres de Miss poste de France donc ..... Razz et pis de toutes facons comme soft de doanload il n'utilise pas Itunes mais Imule (koi ca s'ecrit pas comme ca??) et donc il a ses propres mp3 fait avec ses propres CD qu'il a acheté chez le marchand Rolling Eyes



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
... Je vois pas le rapport, Ipod marche avec Itunes, alors même si tu n'utilises pas Itunes pour acheter de la musique, utilise le au moins pour créer tes listes de lecture (pas obligé que les chansons soient que du Itunes Store, ça peut être du MP3 ou autre, tu fais ce que tu veux).
Au moins avec Itunes tu pourras synchroniser facilement.



 chrys16 sur le forum a écrit:
Mais faut lui expliquer à not' toutou... Rolling Eyes C'est son coté rose... Laughing
tu n'as pas trop le choix pour synchroniser facilement ton Ipod... C'est Itunes. Razz
Par contre rien de t'oblige à acheter quelque chose sur le site. Moi je l'utilise au boulot avec mes CD perso, j'ai mis toutes ma musique dedans et j'ai jamais rien téléchargé sur leur site! Razz Razz Razz Wink



 S@turnin sur le forum a écrit:
chrys16 :
Mais faut lui expliquer à not' toutou... Rolling Eyes C'est son coté rose... Laughing
tu n'as pas trop le choix pour synchroniser facilement ton Ipod... C'est Itunes. Razz
Par contre rien de t'oblige à acheter quelque chose sur le site. Moi je l'utilise au boulot avec mes CD perso, j'ai mis toutes ma musique dedans et j'ai jamais rien téléchargé sur leur site! Razz Razz Razz Wink


C'est ce que je voulais dire Sad
mais j'étais sous l'effet de drogue administrée par les infirmières donc pê que les neuronnes étaient dérangées Razz

Sinon ya pas que Itunes.... mais c'est une autre histoire... Vais me coucher ch'uis KO biz



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
... Pas d'Itunes, pas d'Ipod ... il doit eixster des softs le remplaçant, mais je n'en suis pas sûr.



 S@turnin sur le forum a écrit:
lmame :
... Pas d'Itunes, pas d'Ipod ... il doit eixster des softs le remplaçant, mais je n'en suis pas sûr.


Il existe yamipod ... Mais faut essayer Wink



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
S@turnin :
lmame :
... Pas d'Itunes, pas d'Ipod ... il doit eixster des softs le remplaçant, mais je n'en suis pas sûr.


Il existe yamipod ... Mais faut essayer Wink


Tu me fascines des fois S@t... Rolling Eyes



 S@turnin sur le forum a écrit:
lmame :
S@turnin :
lmame :
... Pas d'Itunes, pas d'Ipod ... il doit eixster des softs le remplaçant, mais je n'en suis pas sûr.


Il existe yamipod ... Mais faut essayer Wink


Tu me fascines des fois S@t... Rolling Eyes


Qui moi

Moi je te fascine toi????

Ouh la kess ke je deviens intelli..truc sans mes ferrailes ca devait parasiter Razz Razz

Pour yamipod je testerais avec le nano Wink



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Oh il y a plein de variations dans la fascination... Rolling Eyes

Le Shocked, le Confused, le Rolling Eyes, le Arf etc... Laughing



 comte Zero sur le forum a écrit:
comte Zero :

Justement, je suis sur un coup pour des Shure E3C a pas trop chère (enfin comparé au prix standard français Embarassed )...
Si ça marche, je pourrais essayer de faire un comparo de bitrate avec ces écouteurs...


A y est, je les ai ! Shocked


si ça vous intéresse, je peux vous faire des feebacks de mes essais
Very Happy



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
Ah bah oui vas y Smile



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
J'avais loupé la news en Français sur le site d'Apple Laughing ce serait donc pour Mai Smile



 lmame sur le forum a écrit:
S@turnin :
lmame :
... Pas d'Itunes, pas d'Ipod ... il doit eixster des softs le remplaçant, mais je n'en suis pas sûr.


Il existe yamipod ... Mais faut essayer Wink


Tu as l'embarras du choix finalement, regarde ce thread Smile


Commentaires, Pingbacks:

Cet article n'a pas de Commentaires/Pingbacks pour le moment...

Laisser un commentaire:

Votre adresse email ne sera pas affichée sur ce site.
Votre URL sera affichée.
Balises XHTML autorisées: <p, ul, ol, li, dl, dt, dd, address, blockquote, ins, del, a, span, bdo, br, em, strong, dfn, code, samp, kdb, var, cite, abbr, acronym, q, sub, sup, tt, i, b, big, small>
Les URLs, adresses email, AIM et ICQ seront converties automatiquement.
Options:
 
(Les retours à la ligne deviennent des <br />)
(Placer des cookies pour le nom, l'email & l'url)

Le Refuge ^_^

'Résumé des Blogs'.

Liste de toutes les news ;).

 Forum du Refuge ^_^
 Refuge Wap
 Refuge Mobile

<  Novembre 2017  >
Lun Mar Mer Jeu Ven Sam Dim
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      

Rechercher

Liens RSS XML

powered by
lmame

b2evolution